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Lyme Disease - Cause - Diagnosis - Symptoms - Treatment - Prevention

Lyme disease is a condition with diverse symptoms that can mimic other disorders. Information on the cause, diagnosis, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of Lyme disease. Infectious arthritis can be a secondary consequence of Lyme disease, a disorder caused by a bacterial infection transmitted by a tick.
  1. A - Z: Joint Pain
  2. A - Z: Types of Arthritis
  3. Infectious Arthritis
  4. Lyme Disease: Basics (6)
  5. Lyme Disease: Research
  6. Lyme Disease: Support (7)
  7. Lyme Disease: Symptoms (3)
  8. Lyme Disease: Treatment (3)
  9. Nerve Pain

What Is Lyme?
Lyme, short for Lyme disease, is named after the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut, where the first cases were recognized in 1975.

What Is Chronic Lyme Disease?
The term "chronic Lyme disease" has been disputed by some experts. Does it mean active infection or lingering symptoms?

Facts About Lyme Disease
Arthritis and joint pain can occur during late stage Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease Photo Gallery
Ticks are known vectors for the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi which causes Lyme disease. The photo gallery shows the ticks, spirochetes, and other aspects of Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease Screening Quiz
Do you have any of the symptoms associated with Lyme disease? Would you know what to look for and what symptoms are important to report to your doctor?

Guide To Lyme Disease
Lyme disease guide with in-depth information on the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease Quiz - Test Your Knowledge
How much do you know about Lyme disease? What causes it? Can it be prevented? What's the association between Lyme disease and arthritis? How did Lyme disease get its name which many people misspell as Lime?

An In-Depth Report: Lyme Disease
An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lyme Disease.

Lyme disease
Lyme disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by a skin rash, joint inflammation, and flu-like symptoms, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. Lyme disease was first described in the United States in the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut in 1975, but has now been reported in most parts of the United States.

Lyme disease - primary - Stage 1
Primary Lyme disease is a flu-like illness with fever, chills, and muscle aches, occurs in about 50% of those infected with Lyme disease. If untreated, the disease may progress to secondary Lyme disease and tertiary Lyme disease.

Secondary Lyme disease - early disseminated - Stage 2
Secondary Lyme disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by cardiac and neurological symptoms caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by the bite of a deer tick.

Lyme disease - chronic persistent - Stage 3
Chronic persistent Lyme disease is a late stage of an inflammatory disease caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by the bite of a deer tick.

Erythema chronicum migrans (Photo-Image)
Erythema chronicum migrans is the initial lesion of Lyme disease, and often appears at the site of the infecting tick bite. It is a red, enlarging rash, flat or slightly raised, and may reach from 4 to 20 inches across (the average rash is 6 inches). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Lyme disease organism, Borrelia burgdorferi (Image)
Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete bacteria that causes Lyme disease. It is similar in shape to thespirochetes that cause other diseases, such as relapsing fever and syphilis. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Lyme disease - Borrelia burgdorferi organism (Image)
Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. It is known as a spirochete because of its long, corkscrew shape. This photograph shows the typical corkscrew appearance of a spirochete. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

How To Protect Yourself Against Lyme Disease
Reducing exposure to ticks is the best defense against Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections. There are several approaches you and your family can use to prevent and control Lyme disease.

Tertiary Lyme disease (Image)
Tertiary Lyme disease is a late, persistant inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, neurological and musculoskeletal symptoms caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. Tertiary Lyme disease is indicated by chronic arthritis.

Lyme disease (Image)
Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and flu-like symptoms caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. Symptoms resolve in 3 to 4 weeks even without treatment, but secondary or tertiary disease may develop if initial infection is not treated.

Ticks
Poisoning from the bite of a tick.

Tick Bites - Tick Removal
Ticks are small, insect-like creatures that live in woods and fields. They attach to you as you brush past bushes, plants, and grass. Once on you, ticks often move to a warm, moist location, like the armpits, groin, and hair. At that point they typically attach firmly to your skin and begin to draw blood. Ticks can cause a variety of health conditions ranging from harmless to serious.

Tick embedded in the skin (Image)
This is a close-up photograph of a tick embedded in the skin. Ticks are important because they can carry diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever, Lyme disease, and others.

Engorged deer tick (Image)
This is an engorged deer tick (Ixodes dammini) embedded in the skin of a human host. In the United States, these ticks are the primary source of Lyme disease. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and M. Fergione.)

Adult female deer tick (Image)
This is an adult female deer tick, Ixodes dammini. It transmits Lyme disease and babesiosis to humans. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Ticks (Image)
There are many species of ticks. Of these, a large proportion are capable of carrying disease. Diseases carried by ticks include Lyme disease, Erlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Colorado Tick Fever, tularemia, typhus, hemorrhagic fever, and viral encephalitis. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Deer Ticks (Image)
Diseases are often carried by ticks, including Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Colorado Tick Fever, Lyme disease, and tularemia. Less common or less frequent diseases include typhus, Q-fever, relapsing fever, viral encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever, and babesiosis.

Lyme disease (Image)
The most common early sign of lyme disease is the appearance of a rash on the skin that looks like a "bull's eye". The rash begins as a reddened area near the area of the tick bite. As the rash gets bigger, it clears in the center and develops a red ring around the outer perimeter.

Dog Vs. Deer Tick (Image)
Ticks are small, insect-like creatures that live in woods and fields. They can attach to people or animals as they brush past bushes, plants, and grass. Ticks can be fairly large, as big as a pencil eraser, or so small that they are almost impossible to see. While most ticks do not carry diseases, some ticks can cause Lyme disease and other diseases.

Deer-Proof Landscape Plan to Help Prevent Lyme Disease
You need to be aware that your deer-proofing options extend beyond deer repellents, deer fencing, noise-makers and other gadgets designed to keep deer away. Successful deer control gives you a leg up in Lyme disease prevention.

Lyme disease antibody
These tests are used to confirm the diagnosis of Lyme disease.

Bug & Insect-Repellent Safety
When visiting an area with a large insect population or whenever you are in tick territory, chemical insect repellents are necessary.

How to Remove a Tick
The best way to remove a tick is to pull it off gently, leaving the tick and its mouth parts intact. This can be difficult because some ticks cement their mouth parts into the skin.

Lyme Disease and Autism: Is There a Connection?
How likely is it that Lyme disease may cause some cases of autism? While an organization called Lyme Induced Autism suggests that it's very likely, no serious research has been conducted to date.

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