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Guide To Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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Updated May 27, 2006

5 of 10

Part 5 of 10 - How Is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Diagnosed?

Early diagnosis and treatment are important to avoid permanent damage to the median nerve.

Examination

Physical examination of the hands, arms, shoulders, and neck can help determine if the patient's complaints are related to daily activities or to an underlying disorder, and can rule out other painful conditions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome. The wrist is examined for:

  • tenderness
  • swelling
  • warmth
  • discoloration
  • Each finger should be tested for sensation, and the muscles at the base of the hand should be examined for strength and signs of atrophy. Routine laboratory tests and X-rays can reveal:

  • diabetes
  • arthritis
  • fractures
  • The presence of carpal tunnel syndrome is suggested if one or more symptoms, such as tingling or increasing numbness, is felt in the fingers within 1 minute. Doctors may also ask patients to try to make a movement that brings on symptoms.

    Tests

    Often it's necessary to confirm the diagnosis by use of electrodiagnostic tests. In a nerve conduction study, electrodes are placed on the hand and wrist. Small electric shocks are applied and the speed with which nerves transmit impulses is measured. In electromyography, a fine needle is inserted into a muscle, electrical activity viewed on a screen can determine the severity of damage to the median nerve. Ultrasound imaging can show impaired movement of the median nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging can show the anatomy of the wrist but to date has not been especially useful in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome.

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